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Dads are What?

June 14, 2007

I was just shocked to read this bit of research from Penn State. (Thanks, Dawn, for sharing.)

It was so earth-shattering that I had to sit down (oh wait, I WAS sitting down). It makes some extremely crazy, way out there, ground-breaking, news-making assertions. These assertions are so crazy that you should probably be sitting down, too.

“…a father’s involvement with his child’s upbringing can have a significant impact on his or her academic achievements and behavior.”

“…prior research on stepfamilies often suggests that the stepparent-stepchild relationship is a difficult one and that stepfathers may not positively influence child well-being. Not so, she found. Many stepfathers can establish a close relationship with their stepchildren, and when they can do so, it can be beneficial for children.”

“King also found that children living with a biological father and stepmother could have a good relationship with their stepmothers.”

“Another contradiction to prior research, which believed a child with two parents in his or her life is better off than one, may not necessarily be true. Obviously a happy marriage between two parents is best for children. However, King said if there is constant turmoil between the parents, their child might be better off with just one parent in his or her life and less turbulence.”

No, you say.

Seriously?

Alert the media…

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. June 14, 2007 8:07 pm

    That last line you quoted pretty much is summing up our sitch right this very moment…However, King said if there is constant turmoil between the parents, their child might be better off with just one parent in his or her life and less turbulence.

    It’s looking like that is the road we’re about to go down…*sigh* Better for all of us, most especially my little ones.

  2. June 15, 2007 7:26 am

    Ha! Ohhhh it’s just seeping sarcasm my friend. 😉 But, this shouldn’t surprise you, as this parallels corporate America to a T. The people on the front lines can make an assertion or a recommendation, but it’s not until the company pays six to eight figures for a “Consultant” do the powers that be realize, “Huh!?! We just might have something here!” Duh. Like your own people haven’t been telling you this for three years…

  3. Lynda permalink
    June 15, 2007 11:34 am

    OMG!! You’re kidding right? Fathers are important in their children’s lives?? NO WAY???

    Ummmm WAY! I cannot imagine how much different mine and my siblings lives might have been had we had a dad (or stepdad or both) who were involved, caring, loving men. There is a huge difference between having love for your kids and being a loving father (or mother)…just so there is no confusion on this matter. A person can say they love their children, but if they completely neglect and ignore them and their needs and dreams…well…I just don’t see how that is love.

  4. June 15, 2007 2:10 pm

    @Peg – My heart just breaks for you, your hubby and your little ones. It is so abominable that everyone else’s lives can be so negatively affected by one person who is intent on alienating the other parent. It’s unbelievable to me that the court system doesn’t sanction the party doing the damage, but instead rewards that behavior by granting them more time with the kids, more time to poison their minds.

    If you are the Dad in this situation, like my hubby is with BM #1, what can you possibly do? Go bankrupt or throw up your hands in defeat. Those are pretty much the only options.

    What an awful system we have that Dads out there have to make that kind of choice. 😦 I wish I could flip my ponytail or wiggle my nose and make it change to a system that actually gives folks an incentive to get along, instead of pushing them further and further into acrimony.

  5. mikeray permalink
    June 16, 2007 1:58 pm

    Subject : Marriage, Parenthood, Children & Fathers.

    http://www.civitas.org.uk/pubs/familyMain.php

    This is your homework assignment. Study well. 😉

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